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the election because you might remember the election wasn't decided that night and during the recount, that gave me the opportunity to receive a position of governor bush had won the election. everything lined up. that was perfect timing for me because right after he became president-elect i had the opportunity to ask him in person and actually took a page out of this political playbook. during the campaign it was going on in my head at that point that i would look them in the eye and asked him for the job. that is what i did at this party right after he became president-elect. >> host: what was his answer? >> guest: well he kind of looked at me and the longest handshake ever for me. he looked at me like he had never thought about it before and he said i really appreciate that and i will get back to you. a week later i received a call from the chief of staff office for an interview. it all happened very quickly. >> host: how many years did you spend with president bush? >> guest: well, if you count my time with him as a journalist , nearly two years. >> host: so you are at the white h
hope not. i believe that the people, the american people spoke eloquently in election. that is the hiscttee voted 70% for the democrat. that opens -- perhaps immigration reform was an issue whose time had come. that's why will have an immigration bill. 70% of hispanics voted democratic but it wasn't that they had a change of heart or a change of mind. it's that they had a clear picture. the fog faded from how important this issue was too many people in our country. and i feel very confident about how we go forward on the immigration bill. i commend the a to senators for the work they did. of course, it's a compromise. when i change things? of course, i do think that's what a compromise is about. i'm proud of the pashtuns are recalling the gang of eight? i don't know. bipartisan team in the house that were for democrats, for republicans have been working on this issue for longtime and their proposals are very much like what had been in the senate. so we're pretty happy about the place that it is. don't get me wrong. it's not ago that i would have written. it's not somet
their attacks and avenged it was elected to the senate here. this is the first meaningful gun safety legislature be taken up since i was elected to this body over 16 years ago. we are here because of newtown, connecticut. there's no question about it. if little over two years ago one of our own, gabrielle giffords from arizona at a town meeting was gunned down by being shot point link in the face and we did nothing. no hearings, no changes in the law. it is just another gun statistic too many people, but newtown touched our hearts. to think is beautiful little children could be massacred in their grade school classroom pier one child was shot 11 times. 11 times. this semi automatic weapon that was firing off rounds as fast as the deranged individual could vote them. so we are here today in the beginning of the debate on this important legislation. what is at stake here? well, this is about background checks. here's the basic questions we need to ask. do we believe the current federal law, which prohibits a convicted felon, a person under the court to avoid domestic abuse, a person judged mentall
three trials, and 2000 for being an election year, and the republican party being famous for being spineless did nothing. helddent bush should have an immediate press conference, announced the justices on the supreme court are insane. these people are not bank robbers. they are harming terrorist. toy will not be given access lawyers, not given civilian trials. we will line them up against the wall and shoot them. host: we will have to leave it there. guest: the supreme court decision he was referring to in 2004 did not say they were required to go to article ii courts, and the detainees, lawyers were working very hard on behalf of the detainees and filed the first sue for access to the detainees and on release, weeks after they got there in january 2002, and i would say saidi have pushed for and publicly many times and luckily it is happening now, that especially the detainees before military commissions in the 9/11 as cole walmart, be given the most highly qualified, as defense counsel our country has produced. they have these council. the besthe lawyers are criminal defense lawye
members who voted the other way today and perhaps in the next election to challenge them. bring the issue forward to the american people. this is worth the fight. we have got to stand up to bring sensible gun safety to america. god forbid what tomorrow's victims will be, but we know they will be there. we have to do everything we can to spare another family from this agree. thank you. let me salute all of my andeagues, particularly joe the families who have lit a candle. that is a hard, hard thing to do when you go through what they went through. you do not want to get out of bed, let alone come here and argue truth to power, which you have done. it will not be forgotten. it will be helpful. mistruth, brute, political force won out over what is right. america will be a less safe place because of it. i say to the families, i say to the american people, many cannot understand what is happening here in this capital. don't give up faith. things change quickly in washington. they have changed for gay marriage. they are changing for immigration. they will change for gun safety sooner than you t
in vietnam and trying to end it, first as an activist and then as an -- actually an elected leader in my county. and i think about how many people died in the ten-year war of vietnam, and it's a little bit more than 50,000 in a ten-year period, and it turned our country upside-down, upside-down. i have to tell you, i lived through it. generation against generation. it was a very, very tough time in this nation. people lost faith in the country. it was tough. and yet we have 31,000 people killed every year in america, and it's something we all kind of just say okay, that's terrible, but we don't do anything about it. but we are about to do something about it. that is very important, i think, and it may not be everything that i would want to do, given my history on this issue, but i will say if we can move forward with sensible background checks -- and i thank senators manchin and toomey so much, so much for their work on this -- and we can do something about straw purchasers and we can do something about making our schools safer which i am pleased to say i wrote the legislation that's in
, we have an elected to an office to serve the public, and our concern is public safety for our counties, ountry, and that iswewa know ss spoke a while ago with ice, he is asking that we be allowed to do our jobs, and i am asking the federal government to protect our borders. if we let them do their jobs, with the law that is already in place and we can secure this border and move forward with the problem at hand which is immigration reform. there are problems there, but we have to deal with that in that order. you very much. be a shareaker will from massachusetts. from massachusetts. >> i want to thank you for your leadership on this issue insisting law-enforcement be included in this policy that will, wall at some point here in the united states. there are 5 million people waiting behind the borders and around the world, respecting the law of the united states, waiting their turn to begin a pathway to citizenship. we currently have nearly 12 million people since 1986 to have ignored and disrespect a at of our country, and either overstayed their visit have entered the country
the public is engageed and when the public that sent elected officials to washington makes clear to the elected officials that what the evaluations are in their jobs, and in this case, whatever the state is, there's a majority in the state that's disappointed in the vote taken, if the vote was no, by a united states senator, so we, as the president did, call on the frustrated constituents to make their frustration known. >> generally, the way they do that is in election. are you waiting for the next election? >> no, i don't think it requires an election, necessarily, to bring about that change. i think that there is an opportunity for americans who are frustrated by the failure of the senate to act in a common sense way, in a way supported by the vast majority of the american people, to make their unhappiness and frustration known sooner than the next election, and, you know, there's a variety of means available to the the citizens of the country to communicate with their lawmakers and make views known. >> the background checks -- >> look, i think it's no. the president is commit
, the gentleman called in about the radicals. let us not forget it was "occupy wall street" before the election. they were throwing bricks and chant ofcars with ta "viva revolution." let's look at both sides. host: the sun twitter -- -- this on twitter -- steve from savannah, georgia. caller: i am calling in because i am not only outraged at what happened but your first caller, she spoke with a nice british accents telling people how she was so patriotic when she took her oath of office in this country and people she looked around the room and she was the only one who belong here and so forth. basically saying that people who did not look like her did not belong here. -- this isis citizen a british citizen. if any citizen of that country immigrates to britain, people like curt treat them as if they do not belong there. britain colonizes those countries. about howing patriotic -- basically trying to tell people in this country that they should exclude certain people. because she is accepted hear other people do not belong here. i was really offended by her comments because i took an oath in this
of people like pat toomey to get back to the middle so they can win elections again and nra is very busy recruiting the angry people to them and that is what this is about. i think we had to have this battle. we may have had to lose this battle in order to galvanize the american people to understand how they are being blackmailed by the far right. >> a lot to go through to get anywhere. mark halpern, bring us into the mindset of someone who voted no here? what was the process of thinking before making that vote? >> well, look. it's a complicated issue and yesterday was an emotional day. i don't want to impugn people's motives. a lot of number of republican senators would have voted different had they not been afraid of the consequences. the president and vice president were emotional yesterday and i think they are struggling how to regroup from this. it's hard for me to see another vote any time soon unless they change the bill slightly. >> mark. >> yeah. >> can i ask, how is this a complicated issue? >> yeah. i really want to know. >> you said -- you said it was a complicated issue. as
to limited government anfree eerprisand who helped elect me in 2010 -- i would remind them that america is a nation of immigrants. both parties have failed to enforce the law and as a result we have millions who are here against our immigration laws. we will not deport them. let's secure the borders. they will pay a fine and start paying taxes. we all wish we didn't have this problem, but we do. ,eaving things to way they are that is the real amnesty. [speaking spanish] [speaking spanish] thank you. [applause] >> i thought i might go last. it would allow me to say i agree with everything that was said. i thk my colleags up here for showing me how the senate can work. it will take more effort to get this bill passed. this bill is incredibly important to people in my state. i think lindsey graham named it well when he called the schumer- mccain. the leadership of those two gentlemen in this process has been outstanding. it was everything i wished i could see since i have been here. when this bill is passed, it it will be a reaffirmation of two incredibly american ideas. the idea we are co
newly elected member of the house of representatives joining us in the 213th congress, mrs. wagner from missouri, so the gentlelady from missouri, please join us in this conversation and offer us your perspective. mrs. wagner: talking about making life better and for working americans across this country. i'm a proud freshman member of the 113th congress and we were elected to tackle the big problems and no bigger problem than getting hard-working americans back to work with the skills they need during this tough economy. today, the federal government currently operates more than 50 different job-training programs, many of which are duplicative at a cost of $18 billion annually to taxpayers. with nearly 20 million americans unemployed or underemployed, it's time to cut through the red tape and start training individuals with the skills they need to find high-paying, middle-class jobs. that's why this house in the 113th congress passed the skills act and streamlines job training programs, including many that were identified by the government accountability office and eliminates unnecessa
enterprise who elected me. america is a nation of immigrants but republicans and democrats have failed to enforce the laws. we're not going to deport them. so let's secure the border. let's bring these people out to feel shadows. they will undergo a background check, they will pay a fine, th will start paying taxings. they won't qualify for federal benefits. we all wish we did not have this leaving things the way they are that is the real amnesty. we have to fix it. [speaking spanish] thank you. [applause] >> i thought i might go last to allow me to say i agree with everything that was said and sit down but jeff you're going to get that honor. i want to thank my colleagues up here showing me that the senate can work. it is going to take more for us to get this bill passed and it is incredibly impoortant for people of my state. the leadership of mccain and schumer throughout this process has been outstanding. it is everything i wish i could have seen from the first day i got here. when this bill is passed it will an affirmation of two great ideas. we're committed to the rule of law and
time. in that in november when president elect came up here to washington to meet with president obama, shortly before his inaugural. it was a successful meeting. it is telling about the relationship between u.s. and mexico that the president is traveling to mexico in may to meet again with the president to discuss a broad range of issues. the second reason it is timely is because on the american side, we have not seen the policy environment the so conducive to dealing with the key issues between the u.s. and mexico. is hot andtion bill heavy, front and center. ginsburg indid espagnole. shows, toe sunday talk about immigration. the gang of eight is hard at work on that. guns, u.s.-mexico relations. i think the guns may come out not quite as favorable to mexico's longstanding positions as the immigration debate might. i would take a 14 two. we will be in good shape. the third is trade. states, nowunited japan, canada, are linked in the trans-pacific partnership talks. talks with many of our key trading allies across the pacific. many of us view it as a chance. into thebring nafta 21st c
. rogers for coming together. that's what we are elected to do, to come together in a bipartisan way and deal with difficult issues. they were difficult issues, but we are here today to all support this amendment. the white house and the privacy groups raise this as one of the main issues with the bill. these groups are concerned that there was an impression, wrongly, that the military would control the program. this was never the case, but we heard these concerns and we are addressing them in this amendment. it means that companies sharing information about cyberthreats will go to the department of homeland security, a civilian agency. if the information is related to cybersecurity crime, the companies will go to the department of justice, another civilian agency. the amendment requires that the department of homeland security share this information with other government agencies in real time so they can use it to protect against future cyberthreats and attacks. the amendment ensures we protect the security of our nation, but also protect the privacy and liberties of our country and
who became secretary of state. a special election will be later. the debate is just under an hour. >> gentlemen, last week we had a terrible reminder of our vulnerability to a terrorist attack. as a senator, what specific changes would you pursue in our domestic and foreign policies o make us safer? >> first, i want to thank you for hosting this debate. i also want to thank my colleague, ed markey, for being here as well. before we begin, i just want to offer my condolences to all the families of all the victims and offer my thanks to the first responders, to the docs, nurses, to our citizens who i think behaved so valiantly in such a compassionate way during this past week. it's been a long week. again, my thoughts and prayers are with all those who are recovering. in terms of what i would do, i would continue to do what i have been doing on homeland security issues. i think one of the stark differences between myself and mr. markey is our voting record on homeland security. i think one of the great parts of what happened this week in terms of the rescue and the coordination and
close to one final point to my americans who share the belief in free enterprise who elected me. america is a nation of immigrants but republicans and democrats have failed to enforce the laws. we're not going to deport them. so let's secure the border. let's bring these people out to of the shadows. they will undergo a background check, they will pay a fine, they will start paying taxings. they won't qualify for federal benefits. we all wish we did not have this problem but we do. leaving things the way they are, that is the real amnesty. we have to fix it. [speaking spanish] thank you. [applause] >> i thought i might go last to allow me to say i agree with everything that was said and sit down but jeff you're going to get that honor. i want to thank my colleagues up here showing me that the senate can work. -- how the senate can work. it is going to take more for us to get this bill passed and it is incredibly impoortant for people of my state. the leadership of mccain and schumer throughout this process has been outstanding. it is everything i wish i could have seen from the first day
president george w. bush was elected, he expanded the program with project safe neighborhoods, focused the saoeupl -- same. unfortunately, under the current administration, this has not been a priority. indeed, firearms cases, prosecutions have dropped 30% in the obama justice department. all of us are united in wanting to stop violent crime, and in particular stop violent crime with firearms. i would suggest the most effective way to do so is ensure that we are prosecuting violent criminals who use firearms. and for that reason, this amendment creates a national project exile that would in particular focus on the 15 jurisdictions with the highest violent crime rates and three tribal jurisdictions with the highest crime rates. and it would devote $45 million -- $15 million a year for three years -- for more assistant u.s. attorneys and agents to pros violent gun crimes. to target exactly who we want to target: violent criminals. a third element -- and i would note as well, actually before we get to the third element, i would note as well that this legislation also includes new language
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18

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